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Free BJA and SJI Webcasts

10/15/13

With funding from the Bureau of Justice Assistance and the State Justice Institute, The National Judicial College is pleased to announce the availability of free webcasts in 2013 on human trafficking, notable decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court, and managing self-represented litigants. Each webcast is packed with helpful information and interactive learning.

Human Trafficking: What U.S. Judges Need to Know (BJA-Funded)
Date: Tuesday, November 12, 2013
Time: 12:00 to 1:15 p.m. Pacific / 1:00 to 2:15 Mountain / 2:00 to 3:15 Central / 3:00 to 4:15 Easter
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The United States of America is principally a transit and destination country for trafficking in persons. Human trafficking is occurring in the vast majority of U.S. communities. The Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 and its reauthorizations enhance preexisting criminal penalties, afford new protection to trafficking victims, and make available certain benefits and services to victims of severe forms of trafficking. Furthermore, all 50 states now have state statutes that address human trafficking which will result in a greater number of state prosecutions as human trafficking task forces and local law enforcement build cases against all forms of trafficking. After participating in the session, judges will be able to: (1) Describe how the Trafficking Victim Protection Act of 2000 and later states laws have changed previous definitions of slavery; (2) Define how force, fraud, and coercion are employed against victims in modern human trafficking cases; and (3) Apply human trafficking statutory provisions to case studies.

 

Confronting Crawford Challenges (Part 1) (SJI-Funded)
Date: Wednesday, November 13, 2013
Time: 12:00 to 1:15 p.m. Pacific / 1:00 to 2:15 Mountain / 2:00 to 3:15 Central / 3:00 to 4:15 Eastern
Presenters: Professor Penny White

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The rule from Crawford v. Washington is often stated as follows: Testimonial statements by witnesses who are not subject to cross-examination at trial may not be admitted unless the witness is unavailable and defendant had a prior opportunity to cross-examine the witness.

This seemingly simple statement of the Crawford rule has been complicated by further judicial amplification of each of its three components. What is a testimonial statement? When is a witness unavailable? And what constitutes a prior opportunity to cross-examine?

This two-part webcast program will explore these and related questions. In this webcast, we will look at how courts are applying the definition of testimonial statement to written statements including expert’s reports, laboratory analyses, and other documentary evidence. In the second session on December 4, 2013, we will discuss traditional notions of unavailability, as well as more modern ones, arising out of the use of video technology and protective screening devices. Finally, we will consider the impact of focusing on the opportunity, rather than the efficacy, of cross-examination.



Notable Decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court, 2012-2013 Term (SJI-Funded)
Date: Tuesday, December 3, 2013
Time: 12:00 to 1:15 p.m. Pacific / 1:00 to 2:15 Mountain / 2:00 to 3:15 Central / 3:00 to 4:15 Eastern

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This webcast will address the most important decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court from the 2012-2013 term. Judge David Gersten (ret.) will summarize decisions of particular importance to U.S. judges with regard to constitutional, criminal, and civil law. Judge Gersten also will discuss any decisions reached by the court that impact judicial ethics and judicial election campaigns. Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions during the webcast.

 

Confronting Crawford Challenges (Part 2) (SJI-Funded)
Date: Wednesday, December 4, 2013
Time: 10:00 to 11:15 p.m. Pacific / 11:00 to 12:15 Mountain / 12:00 to 1:15 Central / 1:00 to 2:15 Eastern
Presenters: Professor Penny White

REGISTER FOR THIS WEBCAST

The rule from Crawford v. Washington is often stated as follows: Testimonial statements by witnesses who are not subject to cross-examination at trial may not be admitted unless the witness is unavailable and defendant had a prior opportunity to cross-examine the witness.

This seemingly simple statement of the Crawford rule has been complicated by further judicial amplification of each of its three components. What is a testimonial statement? When is a witness unavailable? And what constitutes a prior opportunity to cross-examine?

This is the second webcast in a two-part webcast series that explores these and related questions. In the first webcast on November 13, 2013, we will review how courts are applying the definition of testimonial statement to written statements including expert’s reports, laboratory analyses, and other documentary evidence. In this session, we will discuss traditional notions of unavailability, as well as more modern ones, arising out of the use of video technology and protective screening devices. Finally, we will consider the impact of focusing on the opportunity, rather than the efficacy, of cross-examination.

 

Managing Self-Represented Litigants in Your Courtroom (SJI Funded)
Date: Wednesday, December 11, 2013
Time: 12:00 to 1:15 p.m. Pacific / 1:00 to 2:15 Mountain / 2:00 to 3:15 Central / 3:00 to 4:15 Eastern

REGISTER FOR THIS WEBCAST

In most jurisdictions in the U.S., self-represented litigation is growing at a staggering rate. While these cases can be frustrating for judges, they can also be an opportunity to provide access to people who otherwise wouldn’t be able to afford to resolve their disputes in court. After this webcast, participants will be able to: (1) Describe methods for making the process less frustrating and more enjoyable for judges; (2) Summarize effective methods for handling cases involving SRLs versus attorneys; and (3) manage difficult SRL cases where the litigants are disrespectful, obstreperous or angry.

 

 

 

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